Tag Archives: reviews

My Review of Breaking Into The Light: Dark Fey (Book 3)

I don’t usually post any book reviews to WordPress, but as seen as the book was by my pal who you will all know, I thought I would. If anyone out there is looking to read a good fantasy series, look no further than Dark Fey.

Breaking Into The Light: Dark Fey (Book 3)

A sumptuous end to a sumptuous series.

Breaking into the Light: Dark Fey (Book 3)

The end of a trilogy can either come as the end of a long haul or a flash of brilliance over too soon. This book was most definitely the latter.

A sumptuous end to a sumptuous series, Morgan guides the reader through her fantastical creation with aplomb and immerses them in the outcome. Never predictable, though one always has their fingers crossed for their literary favourites, the story has and continued to evolve right to the end. Plus, as an already favourite character, I was anxious to see what happened to Gairynzvl most of all and was not left disappointed.

I understand this is the last book in the series but would revisit it or any future works based in the Fey’s timelines with delight. Five stars!


Thank you for reading

Richard

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Wonderful 5 Star Review (Into Eternity)

It’s always nice to get a good review for something you’ve written. Even more so for the last book in a trilogy. For that person to have read all those pages and enjoyed them right to the end is music to a writer’s ears. Thank you, Diana.

INTO ETERNITY

Review by Diana Amazon.com 11/12/17

5.0 out of 5 stars

Epic conclusion to the series

December 11, 2017

Format: Kindle Edition

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Verified Purchase

The final book of Anker’s The Eternals series doesn’t disappoint. Gradually, the trilogy has shifted from a story about a vampire to a story about a man seeking the truth of his life and discovering what it is to be human. This is a trilogy that must be read in sequence as the action continues without backstory through the strange and epic landscapes of a dying world.

The search for Linka leads Jean, Merriweather, and Aurora from the Arctic ice to the Baltic sea. Secrets of the past are revealed and reconciled, and at the final confrontation with his enemies, Jean endures betrayal but also learns the truth of his destiny.

Anker’s writing is stylistically poetic, the pace of the book steady, and dialog natural as well as imbued with personality. The verbal repartee between Jean and Merriweather is characteristic of their relationship and a pleasure to read. Walter Merriweather takes on a greater role in this book. Reveals about his history, personality, and motives is perhaps the most interesting and startling part of the story. The ending is an emotional and exquisite read.

If you enjoy vampires, epic vistas, tales of redemption, and stylistic writing, this series is well worth picking up.


As always

Thank you for reading

Richard

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

Book Review – Holy Remedy by J. G. Martins

Holy Remedy
A unique and enjoyable fantasy.
Holy Remedy is the first book in The Invisible Conflict Chronicles by J. G. Martins. Set in the thirteenth century kingdoms of the Magyars, the book is instantly recognisable to so many fantasy novels by its departure from those more usual settings. A feather in the cap to the author.
The Knight, Rodger Clement, is sent out to find a cure to the Baron Levente’s illness by (everybody boo,) Bishop Konrad. Konrad is a man with a desire for power at his core and will stop at nothing to gain it.
A story with much to admire, particularly in the use and believablity of its characters, the story speeds along with an almost continual trail of twists and subterfuge. The book keeps the reader on edge from start to finish and will leave them licking their lips at the prospect of more, which I understand there will be.
Short in length though not in content, Holy Remedy is a story that one can read almost in a single sitting. A few grammatical errors, all easily fixable, prevent a five star review, but if fixed there would be no hesitation from me in upping this to a five.
Highly recommended.

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Biography
J. G. Martins received an engineering degree in telecommunications. He was a professor of physics and other scientific subjects at a university, prior to devoting himself to his true passion – creating and telling stories.
Passionate about music, food and literature, when he’s not writing, he spends his time reading about history, the mysteries of the universe and searching for his favorite sushi.
In the meantime, he’ll continue with the creative work. New stories about the Invisible Conflict Chronicles will be revealed soon.

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Click Here To Purchase: Holy Remedy

One Should Always Say Thank You

I don’t want money and I don’t want fame. I would, however, like to be recognised for being good at what I do. One day, anyway.

Accordingly, I would like to extend an enormous thank you to (and you all know who you are) the many people who have written such wonderful reviews of my books. It is a constant source of personal pride to see people enjoying my words and then taking the time to write about them. To see people being so generous from all over the world Canada to Australia, USA to Germany, the UK and beyond never ceases to amaze me.

There is a lot made these days of how important it is for authors to receive reviews, especially so on Amazon, to help further their career, and nothing could be further from the truth. However, the reverse is rarely spoken of. An author should always thank people for spending their hard earned cash on his or her work, taking time out of their lives to read and hopefully review them, or just for spreading good vibes. I hope to never lose sight of this.

My dream of one day being regarded as good depends on you all and I can’t thank you enough for bringing me closer to it every single day.

Thank you again

Richard

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

The Eternals

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Hunter Hunted

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Into Eternity (Very Soon!)

The Crime and Detection Book List

As I’ve said before, I go through periods where I can’t get enough of one genre or another. For a time, crime and detection stories were my genres of choice. My passage through theses genres went something like this: Fantasy-Steampunk-Victorian Literature-Victorian Detection-Detection-Murder-Scandinavian Crime. I know that’s a funny old way of doing things but that’s how my mind works.

Anyhow, the result of said ramblings through murder were not just to make me the world’s greatest detective, but to have a much more varied outlook on the books I read. The most pertinent example would be the Scandinavian authors and my absolute love of the barren way they often write. Again, so different to anyone else and utterly enthralling. So, that’s where I’ll start. As always, I own every one of these books and my opinions are my own.

Unseen/ Mari Jungstedt

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I loved the way Mari created an unmistakably Scandinavian ambience to this series, you could feel the chill, the cold sea, everything. Brilliant.

Italian Shoes / Henning Mankell

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I took a bit of a liberty placing this book in this category but not too much. It’s a hard one to describe, but my lasting memory was of the anthill that slowly grew in the protagonist’s shack. You don’t see that every day.

The Death of a Red Heroine

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In the same way the above authors evoked Scandinavia, Qui Xiaolong does the same with modern day China. This book oozes The Orient from the food upwards. A great read.

Blood On The Mink / Robert Silverberg

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Allegedly, Silverberg couldn’t even remember writing this. I was greatly cheered to read that salient detail as I’m always doing the same.

Die A Little / Megan Abbott

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If ever a book could be described as Film Noir, then this it. I enjoyed Die A Little an awful lot and read several more of Abbott’s stories because of it.

The Bone Garden / Tess Gerritsen

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This is a time hopping story that was constructed in a very easy to read manner. I enjoyed this a lot. The other good thing about Tess’s books was that when I resigned from work to write full time, you could always buy them on three for one. (Every penny counts.)

A Death in Tuscany / Michele Giuttari

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It was set in Tuscany. I love Tuscany. ‘Nuff said.

Sexton Blake, Detective / Various

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Born of the Penny Dreadfuls, Sexton Blake was a varied read that I felt encapsulated the period perfectly. A nice alternative to Sherlock Holmes and Denis Nayland Smith, (as you know, I hate reading the same as everyone else).

The Affair of the Mutilated Mink / James Anderson

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If you like your British murders to be old school with a touch of whimsy in their detection, read these.

The Eiger Sanction / Trevanian

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Not only has this book got Switzerland as its main setting, the Eiger (my favourite mountain) and a movie version of it starring Clint Eastwood, but it’s a great read, too. What more could you want to round off a list.


I hope you enjoyed the choices. If you want another list doing just shout out in the comments.

Thank you for reading

Richard

Richard M. Ankers, author of The Eternals trilogy.

Amazon (US)

Amazon (UK)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If The Moon Could See Me Now

If the moon could see me now
Playing in the sun
Running on a windswept day
Smiling, having fun

If the moon could see me now
Basking in the light
Soaking up the solar rays
Shades against the bright

If the moon could see me now
Watching beauty shine
Flowers, birds, and pretty things
Isn’t it divine

If the moon could see me now
Would she feel betrayed
The nights that she spent with me
Comforting whilst laid

If the moon could see me now
Head hidden in shame
Back turned to evening
Daylight makes a name