The Submission Process

The Submission Process

A Guide For The New Writer

This is my latest Medium.) post. Please feel free to click the link and join me there.

A friend recently asked me for advice on the submission process. It wasn’t until she cross-examined me with several pertinent questions regarding her work that I remembered just how frightening the whole business can be if you’ve never done it before.

For me, and many others, the writing itself is never an issue. I revel in the art of creation, but being your typical introverted writer absolutely dread others seeing it. On top of this, I hate being made a fool of which stems from doing things wrong and being reminded of it (you know who you are). This is my own personal nightmare. I can turn off to what people say in both pros and cons regarding my work, but not to my own incompetence. Hence, I made sure of several fail-safes when submitting work.

Here are a few tips I have gleaned over time. I genuinely hope they help. If even one makes life easier for you, then this has been worth the writing.

The Bio Business

Most authors hate talking about themselves and the ones that don’t never shut up. So, when a magazine or publisher asks for a simple bio to be attached with your submission, it can render a writer paralysed. There is no need for this to be the case. In most circumstances, all that is required are two or three sentences stating a little about yourself and your previously published work or highlights. If you have none, it doesn’t matter, the editors are reading what you’re sending them not what you’ve sent elsewhere. Here are two examples of what are acceptable. Always write them in third person.

Number 1:

John Smith is a British writer born and bred in Lancashire. His work has been published in such notable periodicals as Clarkesworld Magazine and The Guardian. John writes daily for his own self-titled website.

Number 2:

John Smith is a new British writer born and bred in Lancashire. A writer of speculative fiction, John loves all aspects of the written word and its distribution. John writes a daily blog with a substantial following.

Note:

Number one has many qualifications and number two has none. They both sound good though. Never be afraid to tell it as it is.

PS: As a Yorkshireman, I have no idea why I chose to use Lancashire for my example, but it pained me to type it.

Once you have a short bio you’re happy with SAVE IT. Copy the thing and keep it safe. My tip is to never retype your bio, but, instead, copy it into emails, websites, or whatever is required. This method guarantees it always being the same, always correct and requires less checking. You can update it as and when.

Standard Manuscript Format

THE WHAT! Yes, it does sound terrible, but it isn’t. A lot of sites and potential places to send work will quote the name William Shunn. The reason for this, is William was kind enough to create a submission ready template that anyone can download from his site. Get it HERE. By writing your stories in this template or transferring them to it, you are guaranteed a professional looking manuscript. The template is essentially for Microsoft Word but I have opened it in several other word processors notably Google Docs and Apple Pages and it has worked fine. Plus, once you know how it looks, you can always type your own.

One little addendum here is to always check what a site requires. Some editors hate one font and love another, like a certain spacing in documents etcetera, etcetera. That’s no problem just select all on your document and alter it to how they want. Easy.

A Few Basic Tips

  1. Don’t mail your work with a stupid email name. I would suggest using a separate email account (Gmail allows you lots) to look more professional. Example: JohnSmithauthor@gmail.com as against Johnthebigman@gmail.com
  2. As previously stated, always format your work as requested. At times, it can seem petty, very petty, but they ask for a reason and the writer should respect that reason.
  3. I have mentioned before about having a Submittable account. Many writing outlets use Submittable to manage their submission process. Get one HERE. Submittable is a wonderfully easy site to use and also acts as a submission manager/database for you the writer.
  4. Many sites you submit to offer email updates on when and what they require at any given time of the year. As a rule, you won’t get bombarded by emails so it’s well worth signing up to them. Plus, if they don’t help, you can always unsubscribe.

In Conclusion

You will be one of possibly hundreds of people sending submissions to your sites of choice. No matter how good a story is a publisher can only print so many. NEVER be discouraged. If you keep at it, keep polishing your work and choose your destinations with appropriate care, you WILL be published. They say you always remember your first time although I’ve forgotten. Either way, it’s wonderful to see your brainchild enjoyed by others.

I hope this little list has helped unlock some of your submission process worries. Good luck. I hope you become the next J.K. Rowling.

PS: Remember me with kindness if you do.

Thank you for reading

Richard

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

The Eternals

Hunter Hunted

Into Eternity (Very Soon!)

Translucent

Translucent

Author’s Note: I recently shared this story on the wonderful Nicola Auckland‘s blog and have also just published it on Medium. I wouldn’t want anyone having to read it who already has. However, I wanted to showcase this on my own site because I don’t often publish stories that I would say are very me; this is. As a shy Gemini (not a good combination where split personalities are concerned) who has lots of dark thoughts, work like this flows easily. When my mind is that way out and I just allow the words to flow, I often venture into darker realms than normal. You can read into that whatever you like, but nonetheless, it is me.

I hope you enjoy

Richard

Ghostlike the city’s inhabitants roam the streets. The metropolis has sucked them dry. A procession of timorous deer frightened and waiting to bolt, they make their way to wherever it is one goes during the day in a wide-eyed trance. I watch them with sadness, and I hope compassion. I hate to think someone would not extend me the same small civility.

The cityscape rises skyward in undulating waves of concrete and steel; the ghosts don’t see it. What they do see is questionable? Glass eyes, unblinking, roam everywhere but where they wish. The city’s full sidewalks suffer them to present a weak delusion of sanity. That’s all it is. The city is dead, it just doesn’t know it yet.

Old school, my mother would say, and I suppose I am. When a pretty girl slides by, her feet unseen in the city’s oppressive smog, I raise my hat and smile politely. Sometimes, they even respond. Most times, they don’t. On the rare occasion when one looks my way starry-eyed and shell-shocked, a rabbit in the headlights, it makes my heart beat. I like to feel my heart beat as it reassures me I am not like they. I am alive. Yes, I am alive. I must be, mustn’t I?

My perambulations conform to the city’s expectations: I stick to the main streets, ignore the side streets, and never ever enter the backstreets. There are weird creatures in those inhospitable dark spots, strange and un-wonderful beings. I fear them as they fear life.

The waterfront offers the greatest relief from my waking nightmare. Looking out upon a sea comprising trillions of raindrops, the very same that’ve run down my face and tickled my nose and will one day become an ocean of even greater values, makes me dream. Imagining the recycling atoms, what they must have seen on their journeys through every stage of the earth’s awakening and impending departure, gets the old grey matter churning. I hope that’s the case, anyway, as I’d hate to think it’s old memories relived. I’ve already forgotten too much to bear, having lost even more.

Vitreous, I think to myself, as the harbour stands like a millpond, not a ripple, not a blemish in sight, glasslike. It is almost the exact same consistency as the skins of the urbanites who roam the disconsolate streets. And I wonder, has fate dipped them in the ocean and sent them on their way? Should I? Will it help to blend in with the other poor, unfortunate souls?

I must stop thinking such rubbish if I am to remain apart. Uniqueness is a gift one should embrace and take pride in, not disparage. Some call it mutation, but not I, for is it not uniqueness that has transformed us from one thing to another, bettered ourselves, not abnormality. But it takes two unique individuals to proliferate the theory and I am only one. Still, one of the blank faces may one day smile back and I’ll know a fellow human exists, not a translucent fake as is the case.

Sometimes on clear nights when the moon is full and the city sleeps, I sit out on my balcony and take in the vista. I enjoy it. The sheen of celestial splendour enlivens the soul if you have one. There is a certain freedom in gazing out upon a world that no other appreciates. I’ll wink to the moon and he’ll wink back, our secret safe in the midnight, our pact still operating. Like a spectral spotlight picking out the ghosts of suburbia, I’ll watch the moon highlight passers by and shake my head: no, not that one, she’s lost; no, not that one, she’s smiling too much, etcetera, etcetera. One day, I’ll see a smooth-skinned beauty with tears in her eyes and I’ll know she too cries for the world, as do I. One day. Yes, one day.

For now, I’ll keep walking, collecting the welfare checks when I can, and perusing the city’s glassless shop window. She’ll come. I’m sure of it. She’ll come as a pellucid ghost made real, and we’ll live out a happy ever after like in a fairytale. Or we won’t, who can say?

The End.

 

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

The Eternals

Hunter Hunted

Instafreebie Giveaway / The Eternals first chapter.

Alternate Writing Resources

Alternate Writing Resources

There’s Always Help Available

Author’s Note: Here is my latest post on Medium. Please feel free to click the link and join me there.

I think all writers (me included) have a tendency to complicate things overthinking what, how, why and where we write instead of just picking up a pen or tapping on a keyboard. We cogitate over so many variables with our already overstimulated minds (I blame coffee) that we sometimes neglect the simple things. When all is said and done, we only need one writing app be it Scrivener, Microsoft Word, Pages, Storyist, Google Docs etcetera, etcetera, often overlooking the more statutory writing resources available. Here is a collection of apps and sites that I hope might genuinely (damn, an adverb) assist fledgling writers. The more experienced, too.

Dictionary.com

There are many good dictionaries online and as apps but Dictionary.com is a double-barrelled bonus. Available as both a website and dual app, inclusive of thesaurus.com, it is essential to a writers arsenal.Such a useful fallback when one forgets how to spoll, spall, spell, a writer should never be ashamed to check the spelling or correct usage of a word.

Howmanysyllables.com

How many syllables, spelled as one word, is a sight with one simple purpose to count the syllables we might be unsure of or run out of fingers for. A very good aid for those who write poetry such as haiku, shadorma, tanka, etcetera (four syllables) and need to be sure of their syllable counts.

Hemingwayapp.com

In previous posts, I’ve talked of my love for Prowritingaid and Grammarly. However, there is another kid on the block which is more app-like in presentation. Available on the web or as a download, Hemingway presents the writer with a canvas to write on and then have checked for possible improvements. I would recommend trying this out in the same way I would my favoured two. If such devices/resources correct or help to correct even one mistake, they’re worth using.

Google Translate

Have you always wanted to add a little ’un petit quelque chose de plus’ a little something extra (according to the item in question). Google translate is available like all Google products on the web, but also as an app. It’s free, so give it a spin. Authenticity is priceless in text.

Wikipedia

We all know it. Or do we? I dare anyone to admit not knowing Wikipedia or even having visited it for one reason or another. But if you take it for a real spin (I use a lovely app called V for Wikipedia) you can soon use it for so much more than you’d think: colour options; geographical exactness; history; people, and the list goes on. Bookmark it and take it for a ride, it’ll soon eat up the hours.

Text Compare!

Text-compare.com opens as a dual pane editor for you to paste two lots of text in. The site will compare them and highlight the differences, What use is that? I hear you shout. Well, many apps these days save version histories (especially Dropbox and iCloud writing apps,) which you can browse. You might not even remember some of the changes but looking at them might make you think ooh, that was good! Being able to compare two side by side won’t be an everyday occurrence but it might help every now and again.

Last of all, something different.

Alternativeto.net. If you’re looking for software but don’t know where to start, or perhaps only know of one option, try this site. If you type an app or software name into its search bar, it will list more alternatives than your can shake a stick at. These can be filtered to your heart’s content.

As always, I hope something here assists your written work.

Thank you for reading

Richard

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

The Eternals

Hunter Hunted

Into Eternity (Very Soon!)

Useful Sites for the Novice Writer

Author’s Note: This is my latest post to Medium. Please feel free to join me there if you so wish.

Useful Sites for the Novice Writer

I often think the act of writing to be not that difficult, you pick up a pen or open a laptop and start to note your ideas. The problem comes for many people with what to do with them once you’ve finished.

As a long time WordPress blogger (that’s me,) I know that there are many wonderful writers out there who just don’t know what to do next. Some are afraid to display the products of their imaginations, others just aren’t that computer savvy; I was both.

There are in fact a great many places to display one’s literary masterpieces (hopefully) and here is a list of some of the easiest ways to find them. I have assembled (just like The Avengers) the best databases plus a few extras you may need. To all those writers who struggle with such things, I hope this helps.

Databases

Writingcareer.com. The writingcareer site is a wonderful place to start hunting down destinations for your finished product. Maintained by the more than generous skills of Brian Scott, the website is a veritable cornucopia of freelance information from pay to display poetry sites to major publishers. For many folks, you’ll never need another site than this.

thereviewreview.net. The Review Review (that really should be lower case) is an online magazine with all kinds of useful information and a very handy newsletter option. They review other magazines, websites and even people, virtually anything to do with publishing. The site is well worth bookmarking and as mentioned I would personally sign up for the email too.

AuthorsPublish.com. Sign up to this email and you’ll get a great surprise. Almost every week and often sooner, Authors Publish send out an easy to read email of useful publishing sites and information that open out into a web browser. This was one of the best things I was ever introduced to and has proven an invaluable source for literary aids.

Submittable. Many websites require you to post to them via Submittable (argghhhh!) you scream. Don’t worry. Submittable is one of the easiest sites I’ve ever used and even manages your submissions. To anyone with a bad memory like me, it’s invaluable. So many sites use the Submittable database that its almost worth setting up an account (they’re free) before you even choose to submit work just so you’re prepared. Also, a latest development there is that they, too, post sites looking for submissions.

Two Bonuses and some Advice.

Only about three percent of submissions are ever accepted. This does not mean your work is poor or even anything less than superb. There are many reasons why a magazine won’t accept your work from personal preference (we’re all different) to just how it fits with other pieces. Having guest edited on an arts magazine, I know just how difficult it is to choose from multiple submissions. So, my advice is this: Think of submitting the same piece ninety-seven times before having it accepted. If the story, poem or article is good it will be taken on much sooner. However, thinking this way, you’re never disappointed by a rejection. Rejections are standard issue and to me it’s like water of a duck’s back. Send it elsewhere just try to go for places where the piece fits better.

To those two bonus items.

Storytracker. Storytracker is an app that works a bit like Microsoft Excel but is specifically designed for the collation and tracking of your stories. I’ve used it for a long time and am incredibly grateful to its developer for making my life easier. Currently, I think, it’s available for Mac and iOS.

OmPad. For those people who cannot afford a writing app for all occasions this may help. If you have a browser, OmPad will open in it, has a choice of backgrounds that you can change, and then write in. It does nothing else. Every time you open that same browser the last piece of writing you did will be there. Easy! And free.

I hope this simple list helps. It would be nice to think the next Hemingway appears because of it.

Thank you for reading

Richard

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

The Eternals

Hunter Hunted

Into Eternity (Coming Very Soon!)

#VignetteSeries – This Dancer / This Monster

Author’s Note: I was playing around with twisting paragraphs. Just when you were to think ‘ooh, that’s lovely’ it wouldn’t be. This is one of them.

She pirouetted like a dandelion seed caught in a breeze exuding freedom from her every fibre. She danced across meadows and twirled over sidewalks, skipped through puddles and sashayed between bluebells, a gentle summer sprite without a care in the world. Unbothered by those who saw her, those who desired her, her dance would never end. A goddess, she drifted through life as I mired in it.

I was less receptive to those idling imbeciles than she. I watched them, the anger building, rage expanding. Every wide eye, every drooling mouth, frustrated me beyond all reasoning. A volcano ready to burst, my blood boiled and fingers grasped for throats. She’d made me. Because of her I was a monster. And she didn’t even know my name!

Writing Tools for the Professional Writer

Writing Tools for the Professional Writer

Author’s Note: This is a copy of my latest post on Medium. I hope you find it useful.

In real life, I’m not a fussy man. Sure, I like what I like — who doesn’t? — but my tastes are simple. This is not the case in my literary life.

Let’s get the main issue out of the way: I hate Microsoft Word! I use it when I have to and no more. A modern writer does not need every tool in the book only a keypad and screen to see which keys they’ve tapped. A proliferation of ‘tat’ as my Grandad used to say, or, stuff for stuff’s sake, serves only one purpose and that is to delay the art of actual creation.

‘Okay!’ you shout. ‘What should I use?’

I would never tell anyone what they should or shouldn’t write with as it is so individual a choice, but I can share what I use and hope it helps you.

You will have heard of many of these and I apologise in advance that most are for the Mac or iOS as they are my working platforms.

Novels

This is a simple choice for an un-simple — can I say that? — application: Scrivener.

Scrivener is a do-all tool that can and do as little or as much as you wish it to. I use Scrivener for all long-form writing. I won’t go into details because it will bore you, but the main reasons I love it, are as follows.

  1. Scrivener handles all aspects of compiling your manuscript so you don’t have to worry about it.
  2. Scrivener is adjustable. I like to feel comfortable when I write. I like information available, index cards etcetera, but out of the way. I like a fullscreen mode, focus mode, dark backgrounds and the list goes on. I doubt there’s anything a writer could think of that Scrivener does not do.
  3. Most of all, it’s reliable and multi-platform. Plus, now that there’s an iOS and companion, although I found the sync hard to set up, the whole ensemble is complete.

Note: I would like to add that I found diving straight into Scrivener and playing around, much easier than watching the screencast, (it boggled my weak mind). Others may laugh at this, but better to be truthful.

Prowritingaid. I finish all my compositions by putting them through Prowritingaid.com. You can paste up to 3000 words into it and have the site evaluate all possible mistakes. Take the results with a pinch of salt and learn from them. This is superb and I cannot recommend it enough. I have the full unlimited version but the free one will suffice most people.

Grammarly. When I have put my work through the above site, I then do so again through Grammarly. I find Grammarly better at picking up punctuation issues than Prowritingaid but the latter better at passive voice and adverb advice. Again, Grammarly has paid and free plans so there’s no excuse for not being able to use it.

Short-form Writing

Ah, here we go. As I said at the start, I am a fussy, fussy writer. I like to write on certain coloured backgrounds particularly on small devices. The same goes for fonts and general presentation. The following accommodate my foibles.

  1. Ulysses: Available on Mac and iOS. Ulysses is the closest simple writing app to Scrivener. It uses Markdown, which I love and am using now, but allows for customisation and general simplicity of views.
  2. Byword: As above but much simpler. You don’t have the choice of customisation with Byword as some apps; you don’t need to. The company’s choice of tools is perfect for plain, non-complicated writing in any genre or style.
  3. iA Writer: As above but arguably even simpler as you get less choice with fonts. Another beautiful Markdown writer that makes the job of typing out a story a true pleasure. (This actual post is written and posted using iA Writer).

Author’s Note: All three of the writers above have free services to publish direct to various blogging platforms, (VERY USEFUL).

NB: I would like to give an honourable mention to the new Bear app (Mac and iOS). For general notes and a bit of all the above, the Bear application is stunningly beautiful. A true pleasure to use.

I would also like to mention Pixabay.com for sourcing great free images. They, too, also have an iOS app.

Most Important

You! There are no tools to replace a writer’s imagination. Let your thoughts flow and fingers type. Always write the way you want, about what you want, and others will see your heart and talent shine through. Everyone has talent. Never take no for an answer when it comes to writing. Keep going. Make it a habit. Enjoy it.

I hope you enjoyed this post and can make use of some or all of my recommendations. If nothing else, try the grammar checkers.

Thank you for reading

Richard

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

Shhh, don’t tell! The conclusion to the series, Into Eternity, available very soon.

Ooh, very exciting!

The Benefits of Escapism

The Benefits of Escapism

Here is my latest Medium post. Please feel free to click the link and join me there.

A Writer’s World

Writing is more than a passion, it’s a therapy. An escape from a world that often seems destined for disaster, writing offers that rare opportunity to not just step back, but also, step away. When I say away, I mean by extension to drift off into our imaginations, which is often the only place left for ourselves. Writing gifts us this outlet. For me, it’s a lifesaver.

I don’t like confrontation unless it is necessary; violence unless it is a last resort; provocation without good reason. Some people thrive on such things insisting you cannot be free without each. I disagree, but I don’t feel the need to shove my opinion down someone else’s throat. Neither do I like hassle for hassle’s sake nor the sneers and jibes of those who think they’re your better. I don’t like a lot of things: prejudice; intolerance; war; big-mouths and the list goes on. At one time, I might’ve stood on my podium and disparaged those people who disagreed. Now, I write and let them get on with it. Life is too short to waste on verbal lambasting and displays of physical prowess.

This doesn’t mean that there aren’t or won’t be times when you must stand up for yourself or others but it’s not the way to influence. I prefer to use words.

Words act as a therapeutic balm to my soul. Escaping into worlds of my own creation, which are more real to me than any stage hoarder’s or televisual mainstay’s, cleanse my mind. I breathe every comma and I live every full stop. I yearn for the sunsets and pray for every dawn. One has to if one wishes to convince a reader of the same. It is here in the realms of fantasy I allow my thoughts to shine and my true feelings to permeate every dreamscape. This is a place I feel happy in and happiness is a commodity you can’t buy.

These are the reasons I gave up everything to write and draw a line in the sand between those who say you can’t, or, in my case, you couldn’t. These are the reasons I would dare that you can.

I intend to live my dreams whilst hoping to inspire others to do the same. This is my private escapism from a world I now distance myself from, one where there are too few dreamers and too many destroyers.

I would end by saying this: Don’t disparage writers for living the dreams others rely on. We need them now more than ever.

Thank you for reading.

Richard.

This Marionette Life

Author’s Note: This is my third post on Medium and can also be read here.


Sometimes, I bound through this thing called life, my knees high, head higher. The sky seems bluer on such days, the clouds puffed to cotton wool perfection, the birds swooping for the sheer hell of it, and me smiling beneath. I like to smile. We all used to, I think!
I pray the good times will last and that regardless of the season, the colours of creation enhancing each in their changing, everyone, but particularly me, will know contentment. Contentment is something hard earned but achievable. At least, it should be.
When one allows oneself to slip into this torpor we call happiness it is invariably the time the scenery will change. Who removes one backdrop and replaces it with another is debatable, changeable even, but as regular as clockwork. One cannot allow too much happiness; the world must be reminded of such things. Who makes this decision to subdue, to make the buoyant flag and those once exuberant knees sink below the waist, to bend, crawl and drag, who knows? Arms will fall limp, shove inside trouser pockets to finger the lint and never reappear, life will turn hard and we the little people will suffer.
At these intersections in time, I frown, my smile petering out as though a river breaching its banks and all the accumulated joy drains from my soul. Like a deep breath released too soon, I deflate without time to take in the necessary oxygen to reinvigorate. I don’t like such times. Does anyone?
I am a person who likes to either be in control or to be controlled by choice. There is a certain reassurance in knowing someone has your back, watches out for you, cares. When one reaches a certain age, realises their mother and father won’t keep the demons at bay and that the nightmares they pretended to expel are in fact more real than childhood could ever perceive and the lack of direction they gave is a lacking you will carry through the rest of life, it is hard. You don’t want it to be so, but it is. I don’t think anyone does, do they?
And so it is you wake up one day, the lines cut, your celestial strings draped over the bedpost. You don’t have the strength to lift your arms, legs or even your head, and no one is going to help you. It doesn’t have to be this way. I don’t think it ever was, was it?
This marionette life requires a good puppeteer. I think we all deserve to at least breathe freedom through clean, expanded lungs whilst thinking it our choice, or at least with the knowledge those controlling us want that too. Do we have that? I’m no longer sure and that saddens me. I don’t like being sad, my strings cut and face downcast. Do you?

The End.

A Writer’s Issues

I’m Easily Influenced

The Problem

I have issues. I know that’s hard to believe, but I have. I will invariably procrastinate when I should be writing. For many people, this is par for the course, but for me it shouldn’t be. I never get writer’s block and I never ever struggle to form a story. The opposite occurs most of the time in that I can’t get them out fast enough – I really should’ve learnt to type.

The Solution

Music. The answer is always music. I have a playlist for every occasion, in fact, Spotify are probably sick of seeing me. My routine includes pulling up the leatherette storage box I place my feet on — I can’t sit with my legs down — emptying it of my laptop’s power lead, headphones and reading glasses, turning on the laptop, bottle of water by my side and we’re off.
The problem comes in getting my headphones off the chair arm and onto my head. As soon as they do, even without turning the music on, I’m off like a shot. So why do they struggle to get there?

Genetics

I blame genetics for my headphone issues. Man that’s me was never meant to wear headphones. Because we are ancient hunter gatherers, it makes sense that the distraction caused by wearing headphones, which could seriously impede our Mammoth meat hunting abilities, is therefore unnatural to our bodies. Plus we wouldn’t notice sabretooth tigers sneaking up on us. Now, you might think this an excuse, but have you ever seen a Neanderthal wearing headphones? I rest my case.

The Point

So, what’s the point of this needless ranting and mumbo-jumbo clap trap I’m spouting. Well, I’ll tell’s ya. I’ll tell’s ya good. Today, I added to my list of many text editors (they’re the only thing I spend money on and even then not unless I have to,) with a little Mac and IOS app called Tabula. The app claims that just by the positioning of the text in your work it can identify and format accordingly whatever you write even to lists and sub-headers etcetera, etcetera. I didn’t believe it. I wished to prove them wrong. So, I chose a subject and style that had lots of each. This.

What I Did

You guessed it. Their statement double-dared me to get my headphones on and write. I did. This segmented literary masterpiece is the result. And what of the formatting of my work and all the claims I was ready to denounce and hail as charlatans. Goddamn them, they were right; it worked. Ah, well, at least I’m doing what I love. 

Your favourite hunter gatherer, mumbo-jumbo talking writer.
Richard

Richard M. Ankers
Author of The Eternals Series.

The Eternals

Hunter Hunted

PS: Tabula had nothing to do with the writing or sponsoring of this post, however, if they want to pay me a small fortune for doing it, I regretfully accept.

#VignetteSeries – Big Bertha

Author's note: best not.

"She's a big girl, sir."
"Good grief, I'll have to take a walking holiday to circle her."
"She is a little globular."
"A little! Well, there's a first time for everything."
"You've never ridden her?"
"Never."
"I affectionately call her Bertha."
"As in big?"
"Yes. She's a favourite with all the boys. Homely."
"Looks a blimp!"
"The correct term's Zeppelin."
"Ah, that explains a lot."
"Why?"
"She's German."