50 Word Stories – In Hallowed Halls

In hallowed halls we found them cowering like the frightened mice they were. Dark shapes with white-flecked collars, the clergy crumbled as our ravaged world burned.

“Where’s your God now!” bellowed one unruly bystander.

I would never forget their reply.

As one, they stood and said, “He’s already here.”

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AND

AND


And though we promised

And though we said

And though we pleaded

And the world denied

We tried

Yes, we tried


And though our hearts broke

And though we bled

And though it pained us

And the world laughed

We tried

Yes, we tried


And though we left them

And though we forsook them

And though we looked back

And the world knelt begging

We tried

But we won’t again

Cometh the Rain (Part 5)

img-alternative-textA dagger grin flashed from between crimson lips. He indicated to where the others couldn’t see right behind the sun catcher, to the summit of that blazing, reflected beam. The device, his device, burned heaven. An almost perfect match to his shed skin, the universe was no longer black but crimson.
Our so-called saviour laughed and pointed even shaking my hand like a long lost friend. His adulation knew no bounds, his behaviour, manic. He danced and pranced on cloven feet, then jigged about for hours. As those below were washed away, he grew euphoric.
“A second flood,” he hissed. “My flood,” he crooned. “At last. At last.”
The angels fell like cooked chickens thrown from a barbecue onto the devil’s plate. In great hissing piles, they landed in the flood drowning before their tormentor. He loved every moment.
The universe an inferno, the last to fall was God himself, his beard aflame, his hair ignited. And though I wept, and though I screamed, the rain kept coming and the devil had his revenge.

The End.

Cometh the Rain (Part 1)

The sun hung like a golden bauble decorating a cerulean sky. Basking in the pleasures of its gleaming self, the celestial body shone and shone and shone regardless of our wishes, as if predicting what we below desired rather than asking the question. A constant Christmas, our personal star, our gift, blazed above with the beaming smile of a demented patron, and all we could do was accept its citrine self. We had no choice. Who could blot out the sun?At the sixth month of relentless sunshine, a certain someone, who for now shall remain nameless, made the cataclysmic decision to correct God’s supposed slight. He would reinstate the clouds and with it that precious resource the rain. Life would return to its blissful ways, Eden reborn. His message, more idealistic dream than practical proposal, inspired others to aid him in his task. I’m ashamed to say I was one of them even if my heart was not in it. “Cometh the rain,” he’d said. “Cometh the man.” Who knew what it meant if it meant anything at all? In truth, who cared?To Be Continued…

Through Eternity’s Curtains (Part 4)


Our lives stretched from birth to death and back again. Everything we’d ever been and would be unravelled like silly string shot from a can. A painless separation, my companions drifted away as if lost in a waking dream; I would never see them again. Our ship collapsed into the atoms it had sprung from to sail infinity forever, and I was left abandoned.
A euphoria took me akin to the day of my birth, an overwhelming joy. And that was when it hit me.
Everything. It was everything. It wasn’t just a day at the beach as a six-year-old, a night of sticky touches twelve years later, nor that first kiss of married life years later still, I remembered everything. Most of all, I remembered the love of a mother who sealed me in a cocoon of life-giving water. I saw the light through her skin, felt the warmth from her heart, her hand close to my forehead. Everything. Yes, everything, and with not a second in between.

To Be Continued…

 

Through Eternity’s Curtains (Part 3)


We knew them as black holes. One such universal behemoth was bad, two, doubly, a wall of them, horrific. The great beasts sucked the colour from the sky like paint pots poured down multiple drains. The holes in space and time even took those angelic voices, wrenched them from the fabric of everything and stole them away.
I watched from the prow disbelieving, my friends and fellow crew on their knees. To have travelled so far for nothing cut deep. To have breached science and belief, that barrier between, only to falter when on the point of that final discovery hurt more than any physical pain. But pain was one thing mankind had learnt from.
I signalled for the others to stand, to meet our doom with pride. Stand, they did. Chins aloft, eyes forward, we whipped around and around and around, and then in. If God had meant for us to break on the point of all knowledge, to have teased and taken, he found an unwilling crew. Or so I tried to tell myself as everything stretched beyond the beyond and all we were snapped out of existence.

To Be Continued…

Always


I had flirted with the idea of immortality, who hadn’t, but discarded it with little further thought. When one was young, one dismissed such notions. When one grew older, in my case, much, then it required further attention.
I had no need for a body; it had always been a disappointment. My brain required the attention as that was where my true self resided. I had no family, proper friends, not even a dog, so had no commitments to consider. Unless death was a commitment, in which case I considered it fully?
The preparation took two months, nothing more. Immortality, that ideal which had transfixed the Greek scholars onwards, came to me in less time than it took to grow a vegetable garden. I was rather euphoric about the whole affair.
The day came, and I flicked the switch. A cobalt light crackled through my hillside laboratory at the same time as something far brighter illuminated the horizon. I didn’t hear the explosion, but my mind told me it came.
I woke.
Life had left my physical form, replaced with the vessel, in my case an old goldfish bowl full of a saline and vinegar mix, that contained my brain and ocular receptors. They were all I needed. At least, I’d thought so.
My bowl lay on the ground, as fortune would have it, with its lid still screwed on and me floating around inside it. The Earth, however, had changed. The sky was crimson, clouds gone. The sun baked an already charred planet.
Too long. I’d left them too long. Mankind had blown themselves to smithereens and all that remained was a brain in a glass with eyes to stimulate it. I was alone. More alone than any person could’ve dreamed. What was more, I always would be. Always.