Tag Archives: science fiction

April/May Author Update

April/May Author Update

Hi everyone!

Here at last with a cup half full – half empty type update. The reason for my being so late to post in April was I was hanging on for some news to give you, which is still on hold. The May news, however, has come early. So here I am, betwixt and between.

Needless to say, the last few months have been a hectic blur of writing and editing. The Theatre of the Moon is still undergoing some renovations, but looks like being a classy joint, or so the proprietor, La Contessa D’argento informs me. Fingers crossed. A little side project I’ve been scribbling whilst drinking my morning coffee has just hit thirty thousand words, and several more are all doing well. It’s always good to have a variety of things to work on. That way I have no excuse not to write — not that I need one. As regards general info, here we go.

The Eternals has just been translated and released in Spanish. Good of them to tell me! Unless they did, and I didn’t understand what they meant?

Speaking of The Eternals, Hunter Hunted, Book 2 in the series, is being promoted for four days by my publisher. You can snaffle yourself a free Kindle copy from April 24th – April 28th – that’s from today.

On side news, I’m delighted to have a short piece placed in issue 19 of Bunbury Magazine (out anytime now) called The Longest Fall. The Bunbury Magazine is an Arts and Literature magazine that I can highly recommend reading. You’ll enjoy it.

Also, I was honoured to be asked to write a recommendation for a lovely young lady called Soumya Mishra, someone I’m sure we’ll all here a lot of in the future. Soumya informed me last week that she’s been accepted for The University of Sydney, (Australia,) so a big literary congratulations to her. In a world where we hear nothing but doom and gloom it’s great to see young folk getting themselves out there for the right reasons.

That’s about all for now. I wish you all a great, and hopefully, warm May.

Richard

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Wonderful 5 Star Review (Into Eternity)

It’s always nice to get a good review for something you’ve written. Even more so for the last book in a trilogy. For that person to have read all those pages and enjoyed them right to the end is music to a writer’s ears. Thank you, Diana.

INTO ETERNITY

Review by Diana Amazon.com 11/12/17

5.0 out of 5 stars

Epic conclusion to the series

December 11, 2017

Format: Kindle Edition

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Verified Purchase

The final book of Anker’s The Eternals series doesn’t disappoint. Gradually, the trilogy has shifted from a story about a vampire to a story about a man seeking the truth of his life and discovering what it is to be human. This is a trilogy that must be read in sequence as the action continues without backstory through the strange and epic landscapes of a dying world.

The search for Linka leads Jean, Merriweather, and Aurora from the Arctic ice to the Baltic sea. Secrets of the past are revealed and reconciled, and at the final confrontation with his enemies, Jean endures betrayal but also learns the truth of his destiny.

Anker’s writing is stylistically poetic, the pace of the book steady, and dialog natural as well as imbued with personality. The verbal repartee between Jean and Merriweather is characteristic of their relationship and a pleasure to read. Walter Merriweather takes on a greater role in this book. Reveals about his history, personality, and motives is perhaps the most interesting and startling part of the story. The ending is an emotional and exquisite read.

If you enjoy vampires, epic vistas, tales of redemption, and stylistic writing, this series is well worth picking up.


As always

Thank you for reading

Richard

Richard M. Ankers

Author of The Eternals Series

They


They differ to us substantially. The most apparent of these is their appearance. We stand upon two legs, make our way through a tactile world with two hands and regard all through two eyes. In a more direct description, we are paired. This pairing navigates beyond the physical into the realms of belief. It is believed we should live our lives in pairs, couples, if you will, and so we do. We are a species who thrive in plural. A species must thrive if it wishes to endure.

They exist in the singular. They are derived from a singular entity, one that split to spawn many. Wherever possible, they refrain from interaction and keep to themselves. They live alone, talk alone and enjoy doing so. Physically, we are comparable, but they do not see it this way. They look through two eyes, but act as though looking through none. They have two legs, but refuse to use them unless necessary. Their paired arms and hands are now conjoined with so much technology, they have become indistinguishable from the greater whole.

Their name? They have many names and many subsets. They dislike being classified as many and prefer singular — as is their way — identification. My colleagues term them vermin, but the correct and almost forgotten genus is human. They are a strange lot, yet as I scientist I find them intriguing. Though I suspect I shall not for much longer.

Temporal Lovers (Part 5)

img-alternative-textGwendolyn was everywhere. Her eyes watched, lips kissed, heart went out to me. As I ventured to shift the paradigms of space and time, her image sought to secure me. She wrestled with infinity, and I realised what a fool I’d been.

Why search for the answers to the past when one had an unexplainable future? I had wasted what I now wanted to quantify, the only answer I received that which I already knew: I was a fool.

I closed my eyes, reached down a hand I could not feel and grasped fingers lost to time. My brain said push, my fingers did as bidden. Time looped; I felt it. Time looped and whirled and span and kicked and fought and hated and loved and loved and loved.

I woke to air and the most beautiful chestnut eyes. My helmet lay on the floor at my darling Gwendolyn’s feet.

“Satisfied?” she whispered.

“For a time,” said I.

The End.

Temporal Lovers (Part 4)

img-alternative-textWithout sight to guide me, I relaxed into a world of strangely calming pain. I had known my chemical concoction would hurt and had prepared for it, but had not factored for its abrupt dissipation. The pain vanished almost as soon as I was rendered blind. I could’ve been just a fool in a suit in a laboratory in a house, or I could’ve been something entirely different. Senseless, I awaited life’s next stage.

When, at last, a chill took upon me and my view cleared to a dripping window, my world had changed. Gone was my home, my country, my earth and in its place, the stars. The universe materialised in a trillion specks of light. They did not stand still.

The sensation of movement was never there, but move I did. The stars gained speed to incalculable velocities, my everything a blinding single light. At its centre, my love.

To Be Continued…

Temporal Lovers (Part 3)

img-alternative-textThe chemical soup entered my mouth with stinging acidity, then flowed down my throat like the bitterest pill. A churning crock-pot, my stomach took the brunt of the attack. Soon, the pain in my body was eclipsed by the burning behind my eyes. The room spun. The world spun. Just I thought myself time’s greatest fool, a man who in seeking knowledge had ignored facts and paid the price, everything changed.

It started with my laboratory; the pictures danced. Be them portrait, photograph or idle sketch, the collated images of a life devoted to science moved of their own volition, the smallest first and largest last. The final picture to vibrate into life was that of Victoria herself. Gone was the grey gloom, returned the softness of youth. In the blinking of an eye, our sovereign became a child.

I watched in disbelief as the glass viewing portal steamed, and I, unable to raise my arms to wipe it, was lost to a universal fog.

To Be Continued…

Temporal Lovers (Part 2)

img-alternative-textFormerly the trappings of an aquanaut, my containment suit was a most uncomfortable means of surfing time. As already mentioned, the weighted, steel boots I had secured to the tiled floor allowed for no lateral movement. Good, because if they had, there’d have been no telling where I may or may not have materialised, or, rather, what may or may not have materialised within me.

My whole theorem was that time should move around me rather than me through time. If I had interfered with said time, the consequences to myself would have been dire. Or so I reckoned, anyway. Better to be safe than sorry in matters of life and death.

The mahogany lever attached to my left leg was now in the fully vertical position, which allowed my suit to fill with the chemicals required to facilitate my extraction from reality. They bubbled, fizzed and rapidly expanded from the inert lake around my knees to a volcanic brew that raced through the suit. When the liquid reached my mouth, I panicked. Who wouldn’t have? However, by then, it was much too late to go back.

To Be Continued…